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Operators

All selection criteria strings are evaluated from left to right, and precedence of operations is used when calculating the selection criteria. When more than one operator is involved, you must include parentheses in order for the selection criteria string to be evaluated properly.

For example:

(ModelName=3840) or ((ModelName=6840) and (KeyboardName= 46Key))

This states that both 3840 mobile devices (regardless or keyboard type) and 6840 mobile devices with a 46-key keyboard will be included.

You may use the symbol of the operator (!, &, |, etc.) in the selection criteria or the letter abbreviation (NOT, AND, OR, etc.). If you use the letter abbreviation for the operator, then you must use uppercase letters. Spaces around operators are optional, and you can use the wildcard character [*] for left wildcard constants and right wildcard constants.

Operators use the following precedence:

1.Parentheses

2.OR operator

3.AND operator

4.NOT operator

5.All other operators

The following operators can be used along with parentheses to combine multiple variables.

NOT (!)

Binary operator that negates the boolean value that follows it.

! (KeyboardName = 35Key) & (Rows = 20)

All mobile devices receive the software package except for those with both 20 display rows and 35-key keyboards.

AND (&)

Binary operator that results in TRUE if and only if the expressions before and after it are also both TRUE.

Example:

(ModelName=3840) | ((ModelName=6840) & (KeyboardName= 46Key))

OR (|)

Binary operator that results in TRUE if either of the expressions before and after it are also TRUE.

(ModelName =6840) | (ModelName = 3840)

6840 and 3840 mobile devices can receive the software package.

EQ (=)

Binary operator that results in TRUE if the two expressions on either side of it are equivalent.

Example:

ModelName = 6840

NE (!=)

Not equal to.

Example:

ModelName != 6840

Targets all non-6840 mobile devices.

>

Binary operator that results in TRUE if the expression on the left is greater than the expression on the right.

Example:

Rows > 20

<

Binary operator that results in TRUE if the expression on the left is less than the expression on the right.

Example:

Rows < 21

>=

Binary operator that results in TRUE if the expression on the left is greater than or equal to the expression on the right.

Example:

Rows >= 21

<=

Binary operator that results in TRUE if the expression on the left is less than or equal to the expression on the right.

Example:

Rows <= 20

*

Wildcard operator.

Wildcard expressions should be quoted and must be used with either an EQ or NE operator.

Keyboardname = “35*” - Tail is the wildcard

Keyboardname = “*35” - Head is the wildcard

Keyboardname = “*” - Entire constant is the wildcard

You can also use wildcards for IP addresses.

IP = 10.20.*.*

This would be equivalent to 10.20.0.0-10.20.255.255. A wildcard address must contain all four octets and can only be used with either the = or the != operator.


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